How to Win – the unconventional way

It’s been nearly NINE months since my last post. Whew, what a final year at school it’s been. Finally graduated with my bachelor’s degree and I’m headed straight to work early next week. I couldn’t have gotten through those past nine months without a little habit I picked up along the way:

Giving thanks either by saying “thank you” or showing it, regardless of the situation. However, it must be noted that you MUST be authentic when using. Without the authenticity, actually saying the words could come across as sarcastic, while mentally stating it could cause you to act ungrateful.

Even if it’s a crap situation, I still give thanks mentally to the adversary to make me think of different solutions to this issue. Through what seems like a losing situation, I can make myself believe that it’s not and quickly find a solution that would make it a real win. For example, I found myself in this situation while playing Head 2 Head in Madden 19. I don’t play video games often, but when I do, I try to win as much as I can by focusing on each game like it’s my last one. In this case, the opponent had much better players than I did (for you Madden players: he had a 96 OVR team and I had a 92 OVR team). After being down 14 in the first quarter, I found his patterns and quickly started to shift the game in my favor. I won by 7 by the time the game was over. By saying “thank you” to my opponent for giving me the opportunity to learn new techniques and challenge myself, I put the ‘problem’ in a positive light which encouraged me to find a solution.

Here’s an example that may resonate with you, but if not, relate it to a close friend. Over the course of a few years, my uncle would correct my grammar and tell me how poor of a communicator I was. Every time we met, I always felt like he was trying to make me feel bad, which made me not want to interact with him. Because of our lack of interaction, our relationship was falling apart. I wanted to improve the relationship but I didn’t want to feel sad anymore. I ended up using the same tactic above, where I thanked him every time he corrected me during our conversations. Finally, I took his advice, learned from it, and practiced it with him whenever we saw each other. Both our relationship and my communication skills benefited from it.

There’s a quote from the Lion King in which Rafiki says:

“Oh yes, the past can hurt. But the way I see it, you can either RUN from it, or LEARN from it.”

I was running away from my problems instead of focusing on them head on.

Moral of the story: learn to give thanks no matter the situation. Most of the time, wins aren’t instant. They’ll take time and a lot grinding to get the reward. There’s always a way to win.

J.